20pc growth in Queensland generation capacity since start of NEM


First 52 of 52 paragraphs shown Queensland had recorded a 20 per cent growth in generation capacity since the start of the National Electricity Market (NEM), ACIL Consulting said in a draft Public Benefit Test report on the operation of the State's electricity legislation and regulations.

Great leap forward: The report recorded over the five years to 2000, total installed generating capacity rose by almost 20 per cent. This growth in generation capacity had changed the supply-demand balance in Queensland from one of low reserve to one of excess capacity, where reserve was now seen as more than adequate.

Queensland an exporter of electricity in the NEM. In 1999-2000, 370GWh of electricity was exported from Queensland and this was expected to grow now that the QNI had opened and when a number of low-cost coal fired generators, such as Callide C, Tarong North and Millmerran, begin generation.

Coal still king: Coal was the dominant fuel source for electricity generated in Queensland, accounting for 76 per cent of total generating capacity. The dominance of coal-fired power stations connected to the eastern grid was due to the abundant supplies of low-cost coal in the coastal hinterland from South to North Queensland. Many power stations (for example Callide A, B & C, Collinsville, Tarong, Tarong North and Millmerran) were located adjacent to their coal suppliers to reduce coal transport costs.

Main power stations: The combined capacity of the plants now operating was 8635MW. Plants under construction had total capacity of 2135MW. In addition, cogeneration capacity in Queensland was approximately 456MW at 30 June 2000, principally using bagasse. In addition to these plants, there was significant generating capacity not connected to the grid that supplied consumers in regional and remote areas. Coal-fired power stations accounted for most of the electricity supplied in Queensland, a result of access to low-cost thermal coal resources. Additional power was generated using gas turbines, diesel engines, water turbines, wind turbines, and systems burning biomass (bagasse, woodchips etc). Solar systems using photo-voltaic cells were used mainly in small, remote power systems.


Owner Generator Size (MW) Location Type & energy source Currently Operating
AES Transpower Mt. Stuart 288 North Qld Gas turbine/liquid petroleum Peak
Comalco & NRG Gladstone 1680 Central Qld Steam turbine/coal Base
Comalco & NRG Gladstone GT 14 Central Qld Gas turbine/liquid petroleum Peak
CS Energy Callide A 120 Central Qld Steam turbine/ coal Intermediate
CS Energy Callide B 700 Central Qld Steam turbine/coal Base
CS Energy Middle Ridge 56 South Qld Gas turbine/ liquid petroleum Peak
CS Energy Swanbank A 408 South East Qld Steam turbine/coal Intermediate
CS Energy Swanbank B 600 S outh East Qld Steam turbine/coal Base and Intermediate
CS Energy Swanbank C 26 South East Qld Gas turbine/liquid petroleum Peak
CS Energy Swanbank D 37 South East Qld Gas turbine/liquid petroleum Peak
CS Energy/Intergen Callide C (Unit 1) 420 Central Qld Steam turbine/coal Base
CSR Invicta 38 North Qld Steam turbine/biomass Intermediate
Energy Equity Barcaldine 53 Central West Qld Combined cycle gas turbine/gas Base & Intermediate
NRG Collinsville 180 North Qld Steam turbine/coal Intermediate
Oakey Power Ventures Oakey 282 South Qld Gas turbine/gas & liquid petroleum Peak
Origin Energy Roma 74 South West Qld Gas turbine/ gas Peak
Stanwell Corporation Barron Gorge 60 Far North Qld Water turbine Base & Intermediate
Stanwell Corporation Kareeya 72 Far North Qld Water turbine Base & Intermediate
Stanwell Corporation Koombooloomba 7 Far North Qld Water turbine Base & Intermediate
Stanwell Corporation Mackay 34 North Qld Gas turbine/liquid petroleum Peak
Stanwell Corporation Stanwell 1400 Central Qld Steam turbine/coal Base
Stanwell Corporation Windy Hill 12 Far North Qld Wind turbine Base
Tarong Tarong 1400 South Qld Steam turbine/coal Base
Tarong Tarong GT 15 South Qld Gas turbine/liquid petroleum Peak
Tarong Wivenhoe 500 South Qld Water turbine/ pumped storage Peak
Transfield Yabulu 159 North Qld Gas turbine/liquid petroleum Peak

Total existing capacity 8635MW

Under Construction

Owner Generator Size (MW) Location Type & energy source Operating
CS Energy Swanbank E 385 South East Qld Combined cycle gas turbine/gas Intermediate
CS Energy/Intergen Callide C (Unit 2) 420 Central Qld Steam turbine/coal Base
Intergen Millmerran 840 South Qld Steam turbine/ coal Base
Stanwell Corporation Rocky Point 30 South East Qld Steam turbine/biomass Base & Intermediate
Tarong Tarong North 450 South Qld Steam turbine/coal Base

Total under construction 2125MW

Reference: Draft Public Benefit Test Report. "National Competition Policy Review of the Queensland Electricity Act 1994 and the Electricity Regulation". 25 February 2002. Prepared by ACIL Consulting. Send electronic copies of submission to: qldpbt@acilconsulting.com.au Send written submissions to: PBT Review of Queensland Electricity Act, ACIL Consulting, Level 6, 224-236 Queen Street, Melbourne. Vic. 3000. Phone: +61 3 9600 3144. Fax: +61 3 9600 3155. Closing date for submissions is 25 March 2002.
http://www.acilconsulting.com.au
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(2002-03-06)

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Article in: [Electricity Week][Electricity Week][Electricity QLD]
Article Tags: [ Energy - General ][ Energy - Electricity ][ Financial Regulations ][ Regulation ]


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